A Totally Uncomprehensive History of Punk, Volume 4 – Mix Tape Monday 10/21/13

We wrap up our journey through the history of punk with the 2000s, a time when being a punk band meant a lot more than knowing how to scowl and play three chords. With bands adding elements of folk, pop, celtic music and straight-ahead rock and roll, the definition of punk got much more hazy. It’s an interesting — and very exciting — time for punk music. Punk’s not dead, it’s just not sneering at you as much anymore.

This week we bring you a diverse mix from bands such as The Ataris, Me First and the Gimme Gimmes, Dropkick Murphys, Against Me!, The Gaslight Anthem, Jimmy Eat World as well as songs from our friends in Slo Poke, Wrist Rocket, Common Rider, Break Anchor, The Wanton Looks, Few and Far Between, Cruise Italy, P.T.’s Revenge and the Mizzerables.

On the Road Again – Mix Tape Monday 3/25/13

tourposter-201303221-624x964The Mizzerables are out on tour this week, taking the east coast by storm. That made us think, why not put together the best punk songs about getting behind the wheel and taking to the road?

From songs about playing shows to road rage classics, this week’s list will remind you what it’s like to pack up the van with your buddies and hit the highway.

If you’re on the east coast and want to see some kick ass pop punk, check out the Mizzerables remaining tour dates here.

The Elephant Graveyard – The Black List (WHOA-0011)

The myth of the elephant graveyard, a secret place where older elephants go to die and a gold mine of bones and ivory has fascinated treasure hunters for centuries.

It’s not hard to see while driving around the Black List’s hometown of Detroit, why the band would identify with that legend. The decaying hulks of Detroit’s glory days gone by — picked over by copper thieves, pickers and hipsters — are the industrial version of the myth. The Black List’s gritty, no-nonsense brand of rock could be from nowhere else.

Elephant Graveyard, the Black List’s follow-up to their 2007 release The Beginning of the End, is a hard-driving, 10 track record that shoots out of your speakers like a freight train rolling down the tracks, then steamrolls over you again and again, not letting up until the final note is played.

Like their previous album, the band charges through the Elephant Graveyard‘s ten tracks at a furious pace, but this time the music has a nuance that hasn’t always been a part of the Black List’s repertoire.

“It’s not all about aggression anymore,” Black List frontman Jim said. “It’s still there, it’s just not the focus.”